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College Diabetes Week, November 15- Topic: Share your triumphs! How have you tacked the challenges you've faced with diabetes and college? What did college and diabetes teach you as a person?  As a 19-year-old sophomore in college, you would think that everything would be normal. You finally got into a routine that works great for you until the unthinkable happens. You catch a cold and instead of hearing it is just a cold, you receive news that you have type one diabetes. Suddenly, your entire world turned upside down.August 10, 2012, was the day that changed my life forever. I was misdiagnosed as a type 2 diabetic for a year. College, diabetes, and a misdiagnosis threw my life into a colossal chaotic tornado that was never ending. I had to transfer back home to Louisiana Tech University. Everything about the school was different. I gave up for a year. I did not care about school, nothing was working for my diabetes management, and not even my own doctor could help me. I finally decided towards the middle of 2013 to self-manage and treat my own diabetes until I could get into a new endocrinologist office. There was a lot of trial...
College Diabetes Week, November 14- Topic: Share the hardest thing(s) about living with diabetes in college. Don't be afraid to talk about things that are taboo, like mental health, burnout, management, etc.  The Hard Things about Diabetes and CollegeAs I am sitting here writing this blog (my first ever), I am listing out all the hardest things about living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in college when my Dexcom goes off with a low alarm. This is my story of my life. My name is Matt Pugh and I am the chapter president of the WU Dogabetics at Wingate University in North Carolina. I was diagnosed with T1D my junior year of high school on October 30, 2012. See the irony in that was I was diagnosed with diabetes the day before Halloween. When I was diagnosed I barely even knew what diabetes was, let alone that there were different types. Ever since I was diagnosed, it has been a roller coaster ride, and I just want to get off.One of the hardest things for me is my diabetes management in college. I feel like I am on top of my management, eating well, checking my blood sugar, and exercising. But...
“College is the best 4 years of your life,” sounds like such a cop-out, but for me and my almost 22 years of life, it has been absolutely true. I have laughed with people I never thought I would have met, eaten food I had only ever dreamed about, checked quite a few items off my bucket list, and learned to think and act like a pancreas 24/7. I’ll be the first to say, I did not see that last one coming.Six days before my 20th birthday, I went to the health center on campus for what I thought was a bladder infection. I had common symptoms and expected an easy fix. When the doctor came back 45 minutes later, I knew something was up. He calmly told me that my blood sugar was 526. I knew nothing about blood sugar or diabetes, so to me, 526 sounded good. Maybe the scale for blood sugar was 0-1000? I thought to myself. Yikes, was I wrong! My doctor then proceeded to explain to me that I was diabetic and dehydrated. Diabetic? What? No way, not me. Knowing nothing about diabetes, the difference between type 1 and type 2, or the causes...
It’s that time of year again! The third annual College Diabetes Week is right around the corner, November 14-18 to be exact! As the Student Advisory Committee (SAC) College Diabetes Week Intern, the CDN staff and I have done a lot of planning that we are excited to unveil. We’re so proud and thrilled to celebrate college and diabetes with over 75 chapters (and counting!) around the nation for our third year in a row!Although I am not a person with diabetes, I have many people in my life who are. To me, College Diabetes Week is an important time to raise awareness about type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to educate my community. Last year, my chapter at American University checked the blood sugars of students who passed through our main cafeteria. We also handed out pamphlets about the “Betics of Diabetes” (very punny right?).  The event was quite successful. Not only did we inform people about CDN but we also gave people without diabetes a small glimpse into a life of someone with T1D. In the process, we even discovered a few new members to join our chapter. We hope to do something similar along with a social media...
Being a person with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is hard in life with college classes and school work. You are already a minority having T1D let alone learning everything that you need to know about Insulin, carbs and how your body reacts with stress and T1D.  Not only am I type 1, but I also have two other disabilities, stuttering and a processing issue, and I am also gay. I was diagnosed this past May at 28 with no family history. My blood sugar in the hospital was 898, and I was 107lbs. Because of a learning disability in math, not being able to carb count but instead use a sliding scale, really put things into perspective.Diabetes has reared its ugly head on dates with my boyfriend, shopping, or getting a low at work two hours after I ate breakfast. I have been frustrated, annoyed, and learning how carbs interact with my body.  I’ve watched my mother become worried when my BG drops  She’s upset that she cannot  take this condition away, but also at the same time she’s impressed with how I handle it.As a Social Work major I have been learning about different populations and how they are...
Being diagnosed with T1D during March of my freshman year of college was without a doubt one of the biggest curveballs I have ever been thrown in my life. One afternoon I casually mentioned to my mom that I had been feeling very thirsty lately, and was going to the bathroom in the middle of the night, every night. Just a few hours later, after having a friend in my dorm test my blood sugar, I found myself in the hospital, giving myself insulin shots and learning how to carb count.After the forever-long day and half stay at the hospital, I returned to my dorm and my typical college routine, with just a few blood sugar checks and insulin shots added in each day. I quickly found out my roommate didn’t like needles (just a little problematic), but we worked that out! During the first few weeks back, I certainly experienced plenty of highs and lows, emotionally, physically, and diabetically. When I wanted to eat a food I didn’t know what to bolus for, or had a diabetes-related question, I would call my dad, who also has Type 1. Our texts quickly became focused on “BS” – Blood sugar, of...

Double D's

I used to be that girl; the girl who was embarrassed by her autoimmune disease. Well not exactly embarrassed, just not willing to open up about it, especially to people of the opposite sex. I was diagnosed with T1D just after my thirteenth birthday. I don’t know that there is a “good age” to be diagnosed with T1D, but in the midst of puberty is definitely not at the top of the list. Already struggling with hormone fluctuations, body changes, and the newfound discovery of boys, diabetes threw a wrench into the works. The idea of dating with diabetes scared me, at first. I did not want to burden someone else with my problems, nor did I want to scare people off. But then I realized, in guarding myself, I was putting my health and my own emotions in jeopardy.Going to college is a chance for everyone to start fresh—to create a new identity. I used this opportunity to be the girl who owned and embraced her T1D and the warrior it made her. My new attitude translated into the realm of boys and relationships, as well. Dating with diabetes can be a challenging task to tackle in college, so...
Millennials have a lot going on. Many of us are busy trying to get an education, working part time or even full time jobs to pay for school, and trying to have a social life all at once. There’s even more to balance  for those of us with or impacted by type one diabetes (T1D) because we have to closely monitor our health on top of it all. It’s not easy trying to juggle all of these things, so when we’re told that we should do something, but it isn’t necessarily required, we immediately jump on the opportunity to relax for once, to flat out just not do it, sit down and catch up on our favorite show on netflix, or just take a five minute nap because goodness knows we don’t get nearly enough sleep. However, just because we aren’t forced to do something, that doesn’t mean we should just push it off to the side. Registering to vote, (and actually voting), are two of those things that may not be required, but certainly shouldn’t be ignored!As a young woman with T1D, I pay a lot of attention to the news and politics, because the state of our nation’s...
One year ago, it was the week before finals in my sophomore year of college at UC San Diego, and I became ridiculously sick.  I didn’t have the energy to get out of bed and go to my classes, I slept all day, and found out that I had lost 20 pounds in a month without trying.  My roommates convinced me to go to Student Health Services, and the doctor there seemed very concerned about my health. He called an ambulance and I was taken to the Emergency Room at the UCSD hospital.  After hours of tests, and people shoving needles into my arms trying to find my veins to draw my blood, I was told that I had type 1 diabetes.  Four days later, with an ICU stay, a newly discovered chronic condition, and 1 session of diabetes education under my belt, I was released from the hospital and went back to take my finals.  After the whirlwind of leaving the hospital and taking finals was over, I was able to actually sit down and reflect on what happened in the past week and a half.  It felt like overnight, every thing about my life had changed.  I had...
Editor's Note: This blog is for informational purposes only and to share a CDN Student's experience. It is not intended as medical advice or treatment. Consult with your healthcare provider (such as a primary care physician, endocrinologist, mental health provider, etc) for advice, possible diagnosis, treatment, information, etc. for any health related matter. If you think you are having a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Note from Meagan: Everyone experiences his or her diabetes differently. My experience with diabetes, how it has affected my own body image and mental health, and how my body image has affected my diabetes are completely unique to me, but the perspective I’m sharing is also one of many common challenges faced by persons living with type 1 diabetes. Please also be aware that I discuss eating disorders, so be careful if this may trigger a negative affect in your own mental health.In my life thus far with diabetes, the hardest part has been the feeling that it’s not a mountain - it’s Sisyphus, pushing a rock up a hill for all of eternity. When my blood sugar is high, I can bolus and bring it down. When it’s low, I can drink...

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From The Blog

CDN advice columnists talk about which accommodations could be useful for T1Ds in college.
Charlotte blogs about her Chapter's event that welcomes new students to campus.
Our Student Advice Columnists discuss how they tell new friends about T1D

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