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A match made in heaven- that’s all I could think about when I heard that JDRF and CDN (College Diabetes Network) would be forming an official partnership. Both have been pivotal in my maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and served as a constant support system.JDRF was the first supportive hand who reached out and visited my family and I in the hospital after my diagnosis. I was scared and unsure of what life was going to be like, but because of JDRF I knew that there were many other kids in the Atlanta area who knew what I was going through. The first opportunity to meet people who were “just like me” was the Walk to Cure Diabetes in Athens, GA in October 2010. It was comforting to be able to ask questions and make friends with people who have been successful in managing T1D. I continued to be active in fundraising and participating in JDRF events throughout college to raise money for diabetes research. It helped me personally to remind myself that I was victorious in balancing the highs and lows of diabetes for one more year. No matter how old I’ve gotten, the One Walk (previously Walk...
Hey everyone!My name is Zach, and I am beyond excited to be interning with the College Diabetes Network (CDN) this summer! I am completing my junior year at Albion College in Michigan. If you’ve never heard of Albion, don’t worry, you’re not alone! My school is a private college with about 1,400 students in southern Michigan. I am majoring in Communication Studies and Spanish, and I am very involved on my campus. I work for three campus offices, I am the president of our student activities board, and I am a member of Alpha Phi Omega national service fraternity! Unfortunately, my college does not have a CDN Chapter yet, but it is something I would love to start.I am from Macomb, Michigan which is a suburb of Detroit. I grew up with my Mom and Dad and one older sister. My life was fairly carefree and normal until August 14th, 2009 when I went to my doctor’s office for a routine physical and left with a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although at the time it seemed like the end of the world, over the years I have realized the blessing that it truly was. I have taken my...
Editors' Note: Congratulations to UConn Chapter founder and CDN blogger, Jaime who is graduating this month with her nursing degree! Read on to learn how CDN impacted her time in college. Please consider donating to CDN on behalf of the 360 Chapter members who are graduating this spring. Your donation will ensure CDN will be there to support the next generation of college students. I never knew how much I needed the type 1 diabetes (T1D) community in my life until I was a part of it. With diabetes awareness day coming up, I’ve been reflecting a lot on my “diabetes career” as I like to refer to it, both the highs and the lows. Many of the lows I’ve experienced whether it be an actual severe hypoglycemic event (29), the overwhelming stress from exams, stress from diabetes management, or trying to stay involved with all things I love, brought me to a really tough place at the end of my sophomore year. I felt as if none of my peers could really understand how I felt because although our workloads were the same, they didn’t share most of the worries that constantly occupied my brain.I felt constant anxiety about my blood sugar during...
Hi Everyone! My Name is Julie and I will be a high school intern at the College Diabetes Network (CDN) this May! I am a senior in high school and will be attending Saint Anselm College in Manchester, NH in the fall. I am so excited for college and all the new and exciting opportunities that come with it.I have had type 1 diabetes (T1D) for almost ten years (which is crazy for me to think about). I remember being eight years old and scared out of my mind because I was in total shock and completely overwhelmed by everything. If I could go back and tell myself one thing, it would be some words of encouragement because I think I totally underestimated what I could handle.I have always been interested in meeting other people with diabetes and going to events in the community. The T1D community truly has some of the greatest people! A little over a year ago, I had the opportunity to join the Teen Advisory Committee at Boston Children’s Hospital. This group, headed by Dr. Garvey, has worked on many projects to improve diabetes education and care. Members were also invited to a few events in...
College is hard. It’s hard for a normal student. Balancing classes, studying, friendships, a social life, and exercise can be a challenging endeavor for even the most successful scholar. Then throw in diabetes. For us who are “lucky” to have this disease, we have one more tedious thing to add to the mix.I was diagnosed with type one diabetes (T1D) in November of 2013, 9 months before I shipped off for my freshman year at my dream school, the University of Georgia (UGA). While my diagnosis and first months of treatment went well, I think it’s safe to say I’m still learning how to live successfully with T1D. T1D in many respects is an experiential disease. We get better at managing it the longer we have it.However, as I shipped off to college, I really had no idea what to expect. Through my first two and a half years, I’ve learned my fair share of lessons. I want to share them with other students getting ready to head to campus.Talk to your friends and roommates about your diabetes:I remember the first day I moved into my room in Brumby Hall (one of the freshmen dorms at UGA). Soon I was...
I decided to study abroad the summer after my freshman year. I can honestly say it was one of the best decisions I have made in college. Freshman year is an adjusting year—a year to figure out who you are and who you want to be. In my mind, I saw this as a perfect time to explore before I got too bogged down by my studies, but I was also scared. I was scared to leave behind my family and friends for a month, scared to not know anyone else going on the trip, and scared of being in a foreign country with diabetes.This past summer was not the only time I have been out of the country with diabetes. My first experience traveling was a trip with my middle school, surrounded by my friends and teachers who knew what to do if any medical issues came up. I had control over my diabetes, but I still had a safety net. When studying abroad in college, I felt like I was almost completely on my own.Once I arrived in London I had to switch all my basal rates so that I would be in the right time zone.. I...
Almost three weeks before I was supposed to move to Boston for my first-year of school at Simmons College, my entire life was flipped in a completely unexpected direction. At 18 years-old, on August 6th, 2015 I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) during a routine check-up at my pediatrician’s office. My doctor discovered that I had lost 10 pounds since the year before, even though I was not trying to lose weight. She immediately began to investigate, and when they took my blood sugar, it was over 600. At the time, I did not realize I was showing some of the classic symptoms of T1D – I was painfully thirsty, but I blamed it on the hot weather. I was always tired, but I blamed it on my long work hours and having to get up early. I was always hungry and ate snacks and meals all-day, but I always have had a big appetite. I never suspected anything was wrong because I was absolutely unaware and ignorant of what T1D even was.Both my parents and I (mostly them) were already on edge and worried about my transition to Boston, but diabetes made the transition even more difficult....
The world is full of bustling cities, unique cultures, and delicious food. For many, deciding where to go might be the most difficult part of the trip. For those of us with type 1 diabetes (T1D), there are a few more things we have to consider when making the decision to study abroad.I chose to spend this past spring in Milan, Italy, and it was one of the best choices I’ve made in college. Not only that, but I learned quite a bit about the ins and outs of traveling with T1D.For starters, in picking your location, you should not feel limited by your condition, but it might be important to consider the resources to which you’ll have access. If you are choosing to visit a remote location like an Amazonian village in Brazil, you may have to make some serious pre-departure plans. My strategy was relatively straightforward: call the insurance company and secure six months of supplies. Most insurance companies are quite understanding of the situation and will happily comply. This way, you don’t have to find a doctor, make several visits, and set up an entire system once you reach your destination (though it is a good idea...
As a person with type one diabetes (T1D) who uses an insulin pump, I, like many of you, give new meaning to having something attached at the hip. For most people, the only thing they are attached at the hip to is a smart phone. Because type one’s are just like anyone else (but a lot cooler) we are no exception to this rule. Let’s be real, the amount of things we can do on our phone is pretty amazing. Most of us might mainly use it for harboring Instagram likes and sending emoji clad texts to the five group messages were all a part of - but did you know that you could be managing your blood sugars better with an app, too?I’m serious, for me, downloading a free app made a huge difference in my diabetes maintenance and helped me drop my hemoglobin A1C by 0.5 points. I would suggest trying a couple to see which ones work for you. The great thing about using apps for your diabetes is that they make diabetes care so quick and discreet. I’m never ashamed to test my blood sugar or use my pump in front of others, but it’s really...
When I decided to go to college three hours away from home, I knew there were certain aspects of my life I would be giving up. One in particular that had the biggest impact on me was giving up my close knit group of other people with type one diabetes (T1D) that had become my family since I was diagnosed in December 2008. I didn't expect to miss having that connection at Mississippi State University (MSU). I had an incredible support system of T1D’s and their families that lived close by. Yes, I could always call them if needed, but it wasn’t the same as being able to meet up with them when I was struggling or needed supplies.My second semester I began searching for a group of people my age with T1D somewhere near my college. There was absolutely nothing. Like any good college student, I turned to google. I joined a couple of online groups, but it still wasn't the same as in person connections. Then during my searches, I found the College Diabetes Network (CDN). I immediately requested more information because there was not a single CDN Chapter in the state of Mississippi. It didn't take long...

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From The Blog

Seryn talks about the relationship between T1D and mental health
Val gives us tips on hosting a successful CDN event on campus
Meg gives us her tips on simplifying her life to benefit her T1D.

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