Blog

Welcome to the CDN blog! Let us know if you're interested in being a contributor, or if you have a topic you're interested in reading about. If you want to dig deeper into a specific category, check out the subjects we cover below. Happy Reading!

Chapters   Parents    Campus Health    Campus Administration    Clinics & Providers    Preparing to Leave    Career Tracks    Dining Hall Eating    Technology    Exercise    Relationships    Supplies    Research    Job Opportunities   Study Abroad    Advocacy & Student Rights    Conference Recaps   CDN News

 

Question How do I tell my roommate about my diabetes? Should I be sensitive about it, or just tell her my needs?Answer Abbey: Everyone approaches telling their roommates a little differently. I am not sensitive about it and nor should you be! I commute to school and live at home; however, this is a topic we have talked about multiple times at our CDN Chapter meetings. I will share ‘roommate stories’ from the perspective of two different group members.One girl told her roommate the first day they moved in. Naturally, her roommate started to ask questions, and the conversation became very natural. Throughout their first year together, the  roommate started to really learn and become interested in understanding all of the ins-and- outs of type one. The girl said that coming out and just stating that she had type one diabetes was the best decision, because now her roommate (who is still her roommate in their junior year) is someone that receives her Dexcom alerts, and understands what to do in almost every situation. She feels as though sharing her diabetes with her roommate made them closer, and makes her feel more comfortable at school.Another girl in my group was not as...

The Lowdown

I’ve had type 1 diabetes for about eleven and a half years. I was lucky in my diagnosis in that it was caught relatively early. To this day, I have (very fortunately) never had a harrowing experience with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), however, I cannot say the same for incapacitating hypoglycemic episodes.In fact, I’ve had more than a few. The first time I ever had one of these terrifying lows was eight years after my diagnosis. I was in high school, home sick, during exam season. My dad was working from home, but I had been pretty tired, stressed, and moody (typical high schooler). So he left me alone for most of the day. However, he was unaware that I was sleeping through a low, one that quickly spiraled out of my control. I remember through a dream-like haze that he was on the phone with my mom, panic in his voice, fumbling with the glucagon. He had no idea how to use the thing. I don’t even remember him coming to wake me up, but I guess I had been unresponsive. When he had finally gotten a response from me, it was like talking to an alien. My words were...

Happy New Year from CDN!

Happy Holidays! As CDN’s CEO and founder, I wanted to check-in with all of our readers, students, parents, alumni, and fans before the year was over. Reflecting on the whirlwind of announcements and program launches of 2017, I am so grateful for the amazing individuals whose collective work make CDN the successful and fast growing organization that it is. From student leaders on each of our campuses, to our alumni, advisors, staff, and board members- the work that CDN does is driven by your passion.Because of supporters like you - we have over 5,000 young adults involved throughout CDN’s network, with campus based chapters on over 115 colleges and universities. New Chapters are popping up each month, so keep an eye on our Chapter Map to see if there is one in your neighborhood. As an aside, have you checked out our website recently? We have integrated our map with Google so you can search for CDN Chapters, Off to College events, and JDRF Type One Nation Summits using our Off to College curriculum near your zip code. As many of you know, November 13th through 17th was the fourth annual College Diabetes Week. Chapters across the country participated in activities on campus, with...
Question:Hi! I'm a freshman in college and I'm getting ready to go back home for break for the first time. My mom already booked me an endo appointment without asking me and I know she's going to ask me a million questions about my diabetes when I get home. How do I get her to trust my diabetes management and stay out of it like she does when I'm away?Answers:Abbey:Hi! This is a great question! It seems that you enjoyed not being bombarded with questions from your mom. A way to avoid all of these questions when you are home for breaks is to just update your mom every once in awhile when away at school. I think since you do not talk too often about your diabetes management when away at school, she doesn't feel in the loop.This may cause her to want to pack it all into one break. Therefore, I would try to shoot her a text maybe once a week telling her something simple along the lines of “Hi Mom, had a low today while walking to class, ugh.” Hopefully, she appreciates the fact that you are sharing some things, and won’t feel she’s being too...
Tell us a little about your diabetes story:My sister was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at age 5 on February 14, 2001. I was in first grade and she was in kindergarten. It started as the flu, which kept getting worse. I woke up, ready for my class’ Valentine’s Day party, only to realize my sister and mom were gone. Confused, my dad sat me down and said that during the night my mom brought my sister to the emergency room. On the verge of a coma, she was then transferred to Children’s Hospital in Milwaukee and had been diagnosed with diabetes. After three days in intensive care, meetings with diabetes educators and dietitians, the “real world” of T1D hit.While our family was learning how to count carbs, my dad wrote the carb count per serving in black Sharpie on the front of nearly every food box or container in the house. It took years for the Sharpie to wash off the plastic container which held the pancake mix. However, quickly enough, we become fluent in the language of counting carbs and calculating boluses.Tell us about your undergraduate career:Along with the College Diabetes Network Chapter at the University of...
On the morning of September 10, 2007, I was laying in a hospital bed surrounded by doctors asking too many questions and nurses trying to stick needles into me. I remember my dad standing next to my bed holding two Dunkin Donuts coffees (because Bostonians always need Dunkin coffee at 5 AM) and my mom next to me, holding my hand promising it would all be okay. In the midst of all the craziness, some doctor said the words, “ you have type 1 diabetes.” When I think back to that morning, the only person I remember saying those words was my mom. I wasn’t scared though because my mom was right by my side, especially since she had already been living  with type 1 diabetes (T1D) for 20 years.Before I was diagnosed, I never quite grasped the idea of diabetes besides that mom sometimes got more snacks or needed to take some medicine with meals. However, after I was released from the hospital, diabetes soon became the number one topic of our household. Between having to coordinate insulin orders, running out of medical tape, and test strips being found everywhere – it all became a little different. Through all...
I was barely awake, but enough to reach over and grab my phone from my nightstand. “I just spent like 30 minutes panicking and setting up international calling on this phone to get ahold of you—you’re below 40.”My spouse follows my data via Dexcom Share, and I was less than 10 days into my summer abroad in Moscow, Russia via American Councils. For me it was around2-3am. I woke up just a bit more and checked-in with my body. I definitely wasn’t that low, but I was low. I took some sugar tabs, reassured my spouse that I was fine, and went back to bed.Glucose tabs in RussiaTo be fair, their concern was perfectly understandable. I was still less than one year into my diagnosis at that time, in a country I had never been to, and living with people I had just met a week prior. Still, it turns out that the low reading was a false alarm—I had been sleeping on my Dexcom sensor, which can cause “compression lows” – false low readings from pressing on the site too hard. Perhaps it’s better to experiment with new sites for your devices before leaving the country.There are a few...
I have been a Type 1 Diabetic (T1D) for just over half my life, and it is pretty interesting for me to think about how my perception of my condition has changed over the years. For example: when I was diagnosed at nine-and-a-half years old, I asked the doctor when I would start foaming at the mouth (and was promptly told diabetes is NOT rabies), I hated needles, and I wanted to drink regular soda without needing to eat something that might slow down its digestion. I didn’t want anyone to know I had the thing, not even extended family. Fast forward to college where my biggest concerns with T1D were extreme blood sugars during exams worth their weight in gold to my GPA (which happened far more frequently than I would’ve liked), needing to change my pump site after a long, busy day, and needing to find the time in my schedule to commute an hour by public transit to the Joslin Diabetes Center for my endo appointments.Now that I’m four months out of college, it’s funny to look back at class, interspersed with a fraternity event here, a hunger project trip there, and a CDN meeting in between...
CDN’s Virtual Intern, Rebecca, recently interviewed Jessica Lynn, a Nurse Midwife who specializes in T1D. 1) What contraception methods would you recommend for college age women with type 1 diabetes? Contraception is very personal. There’s no one size fits all approach, including for women and girls with type 1. First, I would suggest asking yourself some questions to help guide you to a method you’ll be happy with (it’s ok if some of the answers are unclear):Do you want to be pregnant in the next few years? How do you feel about trying something with hormones? Are you ok using something that goes into your body? How important is keeping your method to yourself?Do you want something that will make your periods lighter? Would you be bothered by spotting or no periods at all?Are you likely to forget to take a pill at the same time daily?These days we have lots of contraceptive options. If you’re young with type 1, have normal blood pressure and lipids and don’t have vascular complications, you really have your choice of methods. Even if you do have an additional risk factor above, you still have many options. One of the most important considerations is effectiveness, as having an unplanned pregnancy with...
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEMannKind Corporation Joins the College Diabetes Network (CDN) as a Corporate MemberBoston, MA – Dec. 4, 2017 – The College Diabetes Network (CDN), a 501c3 non-profit organization whose mission is to provide innovative peer based programs which connect and empower students and young professionals to thrive with diabetes, recently added MannKind Corporation to its suite of corporate members.MannKind Corporation, the makers of Afrezza® (insulin human) inhalation powder, will be one of a dozen corporate partners in the diabetes industry to join CDN’s Corporate Membership Program. The only inhaled rapid-acting mealtime insulin in the United States, Afrezza is used to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes. For more information, including important safety information, on Afrezza, visit www.afrezza.com.“The life of a college student is fast-paced, active and often stressful; and diabetes need not slow anyone down,” said Michael Castagna, Chief Executive Officer of MannKind Corporation. “Afrezza’s rapid-acting mealtime insulin can be a great option for young adults with diabetes looking for an inhalable insulin to help maintain their A1C goal. We are excited to be part of this network and connect with college students affected by diabetes, and to raise awareness while supporting other industry partners.”The College Diabetes Network...

Pages

Hear Our Story

From The Blog

Emma updates on her college search and decision process
Meet our American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions Nextgen student attendees 2018!
Caroline recaps her time at the 2018 Annual Retreat.

Connect With CDN

Find out how to support CDN.

Receive our e-newsletter.

Have a question?

 CDN is singularly focused on providing young adults with T1D the peer connections they value, and expert resources they need, to successfully manage the challenging transition to independence at college and beyond.

Find out more about our current Corporate Members.