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One of the coolest things about the ICE/ENDO conference is that not only am I able to totally geek out learning about new diabetes tech, medications, and methods of management, but I get to tap into my interest of other aspects of endocrinology. One session that I was really excited about attending on the 2nd day of ICE/ENDO discussed a topic that is not only controversial but highly specific and somewhat uncommon in most endocrinology practices. “Transgender Medicine in Adolescents” was a well-attended session presented by European physicians, Daniel Klink, MD/PhD and Guy G. T’Sjoen MD, PhD. They divulged the phases of treating transsexual children and young adults which they have been doing for several years with hundreds of patients. It was really great to hear the actual practice of treatment since this subject is certainly taboo in many communities. Prior to puberty, a patient and their family will undergo significant psychological sessions to acclimate themselves to the process that will take over a decade. First, a child will undergo changes that are mostly relating to societal norms. The child will be referred to as the preferred pronouns and wear clothing and hairstyles appropriate to their preferences. The medical changes won’t...
Find me @ergreerToday was packed with some great sessions. First, my new conference comrade, Justin, and I went to a session discussing the treatment of patients with, none other than, type 1 diabetes. Little did we know, the third speaker of the session was a pediatric endocrinologist from Colorado that we wanted to meet. Dr. Jennifer Raymond has a very successful transition program for teens heading off to college. She looked at average HbA1c data based on age groups generated by the T1DExchange to create the group program. While the peak average A1c is at age 17, the upward trend begins in elementary school. Therefore, early intervention is key. While a lot of this is associated with changing (and raging!) hormones, there is still something that can be done through peer support and open dialogue about diabetes. Not only that, Dr. Raymond threw out CDN’s name during her talk (I suppressed my “whoop whoop”).Obviously, from personal experience with peer support from starting my own CDN chapter at the University of Toledo, I know how vital these types of programs are in a student’s life. College is hard enough. Trying to figure out how to get a new endocrinology, possibly new...
(Follow me on twitter for up-to-the-minute info from #ICEENDO2014: @justdpl What if you no longer had to count carbs? Does it sound too good to be true?Yes, it does; and, at this point, yes, it is. But, Jennie Brand-Miller, PhD and Kirstine Bell, APD, CDE suggested in their talk “Food not carbs” that we should look at the body’s typical insulin response to gauge insulin dosage rather than simply at carbohydrate ingestion. The two have created the Food Insulin Index (FII) which, in basic terms, is a measure of a food’s relative insulin demand. By testing a food’s impact on insulin production in several typical subjects, the researchers have derived a score for a number of foods which, when calculated with the serving size, determine the Food Insulin Demand (FID). Much like the insulin:carb ratio, T1D patients can figure out their insulin:FID ratio in order to bolus appropriately.The idea behind this is that, though carbohydrates are the only macronutrient to directly effect blood glucose, others (fats and proteins) also cause insulin responses. I’ve noticed this with myself. Oftentimes when I have a low- or almost no-carb meal with a lot of protein and fats, my blood glucose increases even though, by carb-counting rules...
Day 2!Well, Day 1 for me. Today, I made it all the way down to McCormick Place from Evanston! Though I was celebrating my graduation this weekend, being at the ICE/ENDO 2014 Conference was a very cool way to top it off.Today, I got to attend a few lectures and made my way around to many of the booths at the Expo. I tried some new food products, met several of the people behind the products I use, and often found myself both baffled and amazed by some of the research being presented.In all of the presentations I attended, I was taken by the complexities of diabetes, diabetes management, and the way different aspects of our lives can affect our bodies.THE LECTURES Personalizing Diabetes ManagementI first attended a lecture by Silvio E Inzucchi, MD titled “Personalizing Diabetes Management.” Though the talk was geared toward clinicians treating patients with type two diabetes, much of what Dr. Inzucchi spoke about illustrated the complexities of treating patients (especially geriatric patients) with diabetes. How do you address a patient with progressive dementia as they begin to make errors in their insulin injections? How do you ensure that the entirety of a patient’s condition is being...
Hello!Corresponding from the ICE/ENDO 2014 Meeting in Chicago, IL; my name is Elizabeth Greer and I am a former student leader of the University of Toledo CDN Chapter. I later completed my Masters at Midwestern University in Biomedical Sciences. My goal is to become a practicing pediatric endocrinologist. Having diabetes myself sparked my interest in the vast field of endocrinology. Jo and Tina immediately thought of me to represent the College Diabetes Network at this particular conference not only because I am a self-proclaimed endocrine nerd, but also because going to this conference would allow me to interact with clinical staff and technology representatives from across the globe!I attended the American Diabetes Association’s Conference last year in Chicago, so I was very excited to kick off my own conference season in Chicago again this year. I will be reporting daily on the happenings of the conference from the perspective of a patient. First thing on Saturday I went to the Expo which is a huge room filled with all aspects of the endocrinology field. There are abstract posters displaying leading endocrinology research, companies of diabetes tech, laboratories, and seriously everything in between. Majoring in public health and biomedical sciences, having...
Hi CDN world!I’m Jennie, the second intern working alongside Greg for the summer. I’m a junior at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles pursuing a degree in Business Administration and Public Health. When I’m not studying or working, you can usually find me any where near the beach, reading a book, playing beach volleyball, hanging out with friends, or baking up some delicious gluten free pastries! Originally from San Diego, CA, I’m so excited for the journey that CDN is taking me on through my personal and professional life! How I ended up in Boston with the College Diabetes Network this summer is an ever-evolving story dating back to eight years ago when I was diagnosed with type I diabetes… after my diagnosis at age 12, I isolated myself in my own world of diabetes. I kept my blood sugars and struggles to myself and resisted every attempt by my parents to socialize me with other kids my age with diabetes. It wasn’t until my senior year of high school that I told my best friends about my diabetes and it wasn’t until my sophomore year of college that I took control of my diabetes, largely through the help...
Hi world! I’m Greg and I’m the newest CDN intern. I’ll be working with CDN for the rest of the summer and I’d like to tell you a little bit more about myself. I was diagnosed on September 18, 2001. I was eight years old at the time. I am the first, and only, person in my family to live with Type 1 Diabetes. I am currently studying psychology and global studies at The New School in New York City.  I am on the brink of beginning my senior year, and I am on track to graduate in the fall of 2015.I am excited to be part of CDN this summer for several reasons. First, Christina, Jo and Amanda are tremendously invaluable resources as I begin to pursue a career revolving around diabetes. Christina, Jo and Amanda are also amazing people – it is nearly impossible to work with a better group of people this summer. The community of college students that are involved in CDN is also outstanding. I attended the SAC Retreat, and was simply blown away by the passion, motivation and quality of college students at the Retreat.  I am looking forward to developing relationships with the group from the Retreat as...
This past week I was fortunate enough to meet some incredible people. The College Diabetes Network is a fast growing and unbelievably inspirational non-profit organization. I had the opportunity to get a slight glimpse of the impact that this organization is making for college students around the country.After arriving in the Boston airport, the weekend began with a three hour car ride and conversation with the CEO, Christina Roth, two awesome student leaders, and my inspiration for being involved with CDN, my twin sister. As soon as I got in the car, I could feel the passion radiating from those around me!These feelings only amplified when I arrived at a beautiful lake house in Maine and was greeted by the other two CDN staff members, Jo Trietman and Amanda Cedrone, and a house-full of college student leaders who all embrace living with Type 1 Diabetes. We got to work right away, covering topics from learning about the logistics behind starting a non-profit organization, discussing the success and road blocks in the CDN chapters we all started at our respective schools, considering what CDN is all about, and defining the roles, and planning strategies and goals of each Student Advisory Committee sub-Committee. As...
Four years ago my daughter was jumping up and down screaming with joy, holding the admission letter to her dream college, which was 500 miles away from our home. I was cowering in a corner, wondering how we would ever survive.Today my daughter’s final semester is set – her schedule chosen, her internship in Congress extended. She’s almost ready to go out in the “real world” and she has rocked college, life and yes, diabetes. If I knew then what I know now … since I cannot go back, I’m going to share some with you, parents of kids getting ready to go to college. I hope it helps you help your child spread their wings. *It’s their college experience, not yours. I was good at this – even if it was hard. The reality is: college is practice for the “real world.” It’s a semi-safe little mini-society in which they can practice real life before they have to really live real life. For that reason, it’s their time to step up, make decisions and take action (or choose not to take action). Things like letting an RA know about their diabetes, deciding about registering with the disabilities office, finding the...
I’m 7 years old, sitting in a doctor’s office for the umpteenth time, and I’m desperately thirsty. I remember crying because I didn’t like going to the doctor, I didn’t feel right, and they wouldn’t let me drink anything. My dad was on a business trip, and my mom was scared and angry.That’s what I remember clearly before officially being diagnosed. Most of the rest is what I’ve been told. For almost year, I had been sick and losing weight. I was on medication after medication; problems with my kidney, problems with my liver, you name it- it was a problem. Most of the time, my parents were told they were overreacting. “She’s your only child- you’re overreacting. It’s nothing.” But my parents didn’t stop. Something didn’t feel right. I had never been this sick before in my young life. Little did we know- this was only the beginning.One day, I decided I wanted glasses because other kids had them, and I thought they were cool. Obviously, I changed my mind in middle school. I began “complaining” about my eyesight. Eventually, we went to the eye doctor in Buford, GA. He looked at my eyes, and he told my mom...

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From The Blog

Emma updates on her college search and decision process
Meet our American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions Nextgen student attendees 2018!
Caroline recaps her time at the 2018 Annual Retreat.

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