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Question: How does alcohol/weed affect blood sugar? I've heard hard liquor makes you go high and then drops you low in the morning, and wine keeps you high? So does that mean I should only bolus for wines and not liquor?  Answers:Zach: Hi! Great question! I can only offer you my thoughts on alcohol and my blood sugar, and I want you to know that everyone’s bodies react differently to alcohol, so you’ll have to experiment with your own limits. Personally, I don’t see a huge difference between hard liquor and wine/beer but remember, there are so many factors that contribute to how your body processes alcohol, such as sleep, how much food is in your system, how hydrated you are, etc., so each and every time you drink your body might experience something different. Alcohol does contain carbohydrates, and of course if you add in mixers like juice or regular soda that will certainly affect your blood sugars initially.The thing to be mindful of with diabetes is that there can be a delayed effect on your blood sugars regardless of the type of booze. What many people (including myself) usually do is avoid giving a lot of insulin (either a bolus...
I grew up as an athlete. I had danced, played sports, and trained in martial arts throughout childhood. In high school, I devoted my life to softball. In college, I joined a hip-hop dance crew, and I was also introduced to bodybuilding, powerlifting, and Crossfit. So, when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) my freshman year of college, I had a lot of questions.What do you mean I have diabetes?!Will my life be changed forever? Will my life never be the same ever again? Will I not have my physical freedom anymore? Do I have to stop dancing? Do I have to stop lifting? Do I have to let go of everything I’ve known as a part of my identity?Once I experienced my first low, I developed a fear of being alone. I was afraid of dancing alone, training alone, and lifting alone. Everything I had always been able to do on my own, I was afraid that I would pass out and no one would be there to save me. I feared being active.Back then (2011), there was no ‘Type 1 Diabetic Athletes Group’ on Facebook and there was no CDN Chapter near me. I didn’t know...

Deephers and Diabetes

For 10 years, I have been living with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Diabetes isn’t always a visible disease; its hidden in purses while checking blood sugar, or crawling out of bed by yourself to chug milk at 3 am. Through all these moments, I have become accustomed to the solitude of my disease and relying on myself to get through the issues and struggles of having T1D. This had been my life for 10 years, letting a few people in throughout the years, but keeping my true life and feelings towards diabetes to myself. I thought this would be my life, but then I moved to college and everything began to change.When I came to Northeastern University in Spring of 2016, I knew that I wanted to join a sorority. I wanted to have that bond and experience the sisterhood I had seen in so many Hollywood movies. I became a sister of Delta Phi Epsilon (DPhiE) sorority shortly after arriving to campus. When I joined, I was nervous to speak about my diabetes because it wasn’t my favorite fun fact and I worried that people would think I was weird. However, once I did say that one phrase that...
Editors’ Note: MannKind Corp., the company which produces Afrezza, is a CDN Corporate Member. One of our CDN students who uses Afrezza as part of his diabetes management wrote this blog about his experience. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) the summer before my senior year of high school. Fast forward two years later, and I am still using the Novolog and Lantus pens I started out with. I am perfectly content with using insulin pens, and do not have much interest in trying a pump right now. While I had learned to deal with all of the inconveniences of giving shots before a meal, I am never opposed to looking for things to lighten the burden. One of the most annoying things about giving shots is when I would be dressed up in a sport coat, with no easy access to give a shot. I would be wearing a tucked in long sleeve button down shirt, and tucking and untucking it was a big hassle. This makes having T1D even more frustrating than it already is.I had learned about a new type of insulin, Afrezza, an inhaled insulin that had recently received FDA approval! I immediately wanted to try...
I was diagnosed with T1D when I was three years old. That was almost fourteen years ago, and I am currently a senior in high school. Over the summer, I interned at the College Diabetes Network (CDN) headquarters in Boston. After my internship, I shifted my focus into my college applications. Like every other part of my life, diabetes had to be factored into my choices.My first college tour was during the summer before my junior year. In the year and a half since then, I can honestly say that my views on college have changed entirely. Many of the schools I expected to like ending up being completely wrong for me. On the flip side, I fell in love with schools that I didn't even want to tour. After going on a few tours, I learned to go with my gut. If I could imagine myself going to the school, it was put on the application list. If I didn’t feel like it was a good fit, it was cut from the list. All that being said, I followed the advice that every high schooler hears: to have reach, match, and safety schools. I have applied to twelve schools...
 Editor's note: apply for the 2018 CDN Annual Retreat today! https://www.tfaforms.com/4654442I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) when I was 11 years old. I was in middle school at the time, and I was only able to communicate with three others my age with T1D.   It wasn’t until I started college last year that I was connected with over a dozen others around my age with T1D through The College Diabetes Network (CDN) Chapter at Ball State University. After I joined this organization, the rapport that ensued was like a true breath of fresh air. I finally had others with whom I could truly relate to, and I have learned a great amount from these individuals since T1D is managed in a plethora of different ways.Since starting college and meeting others with whom I can truly connect, I have been looking for more opportunities and ways to support, advocate, and expand my knowledge about type 1 diabetes. However, that can get a little tricky when one doesn’t know where to start. Add becoming co-president of a CDN Chapter to that mix and one just might have to search for an instruction manual.The aforementioned instruction manual came to me like a...
A Note from our Founder, Christina:We are excited to share our new Strategic Plan for 2018-2020! This plan builds on the community, resources, and partnerships we have worked so hard to grow since we got started way back in 2009.Developing this strategy, looking back at how far we have come, and setting goals for what we will accomplish by our 10 year anniversary in 2020 was honestly exhausting….we’ve done a lot….but laying out our goals for the coming years was also invigorating. The CDN Organization that we all know (and love) today, is a product of so many people. So much of our plan for the coming years, is building on partnerships to create change that will impact hundreds of thousands of young adults for years to come, change which I never could have imagined several years ago.So I truly couldn’t be more excited to share our new plan for the coming years with you! My role as CEO has evolved since our founding, going from volunteer to a variety of focuses leading the organization through its start-up years, and now into our most important years yet. Of all the experiences I have had so far- I am most excited...

Welcome, Anna!

Oh hey there!My name is Anna Floreen Sabino and I'm new here. I recently (aka this week) joined the CDN team as the Special Projects Manager and am excited to hone in on the area of the T1D space that I am most passionate about- empowering teens and young adults with T1D to aspire and thrive despite living with a chronic illness. As I dig in to my role I'm really excited to specifically be focusing on CDN's newly launched strategic plan- building on the community, resources, and partnerships the CDN team has worked so hard to grow since CDN originally got started back in 2009. All of that is to say- we are excited to foster an organization which: Understands the barriers faced by the transitioning young adult population and has the tools and direction to assist young adults in overcoming these barriers.Advocates on behalf of young adults with T1D, leveraging a reputation of excellence and collaborative strategic alliances to ensure our members’ voices are heard across the sector.Creates an environment rich with opportunities for passionate young leaders to pursue inspiring careers in the diabetes sector.After 5 years working at the T1D Exchange I'm looking forward to utilizing all I...

Studying at Sea with T1D

Thirty-five glucagon. Thirty-five. I’d heard the hesitation in my endocrinologist’s voice as she prescribed them, wondering what sort of mess I was getting myself into this time around. I’d seen the skepticism on the face of the pharmacist who handed over the bag full of the red containers and the unasked questions.I didn’t care. If carrying around an extra backpack stuffed with syringes, Omnipods, CGM kits, and test strips was the cost for my impending adventure, I would gladly pay it. After all, how many people get to spend a month sailing across the deep, open waters of the Atlantic? How many people get to experience the boundless joy of hanging from the rigging of a tall ship, or of swimming a thousand miles from the nearest land?And among those limited few, how many of these were a type one diabetic?Well, judging by the worry of my parents, endocrinologist, and the medical board of my study abroad program, not many. Now, my family and doctors are used to this sort of thing; I have a (in my opinion, wonderful, in their opinion, stress-inducing) habit of running off to the remote corners of our world, out of contact and certainly out...
What were you doing on November 6, 2007?  How old were you?  On November 6, 2007, I was diagnosed with type one diabetes (T1D).  I was eleven years old.  Ten years later, I am finally able to fully look back and reflect on the biggest life-changing event that has happened to me so far.November 1, 2007 was about the time when symptoms started to become noticeable.  I spent each night chugging down at least three bottles of water as I woke up sporadically from my extremely uncomfortable dry mouth. Unsurprisingly, I was also moseying my way to the bathroom over three times each night. As a sixth grader, I was starting to face body image issues as well.  My body was changing and I was not too pleased with the results.  However, because a symptom of type one diabetes is drastic weight loss, you could actually see my ribs poking out of my torso. Yet, I was still unhappy and found things I didn’t like.Before I knew it, I was in the bathroom yet again, getting ready for our church’s Sunday morning service.  This time, I was physically unable to get up from the toilet seat. My body was failing...

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From The Blog

Emma updates on her college search and decision process
Meet our American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions Nextgen student attendees 2018!
Caroline recaps her time at the 2018 Annual Retreat.

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