Technology

Editors’ Note: Medtronic is a CDN Corporate Member and one of the participants in their MiniMed 670G clinical trial recently shared her experience with us. We recommend students participate in trials – it is a great way to learn more about what is happening in the diabetes sector! You can find trials near you here. My name is Ashlee and I’m a senior in a university nursing program in Denver, Colorado. I was diagnosed with type one diabetes (T1D) at the age of nine and have had a passion for diabetes treatment and research since a young age. I participated in the MiniMed 670G trial after being involved in other various Medtronic trials throughout the years. This trial would help Medtronic gain FDA approval on their hybrid closed loop system. (Yes, please!)I knew this would be a great opportunity but a big commitment. The study consisted of a one-week long overnight stay (with a steep learning curve), frequent downloads of my device data, and multiple check-ins throughout the process. After I completed the first part of the study, I was able to become part of a continuation phase which means I could wear it in the real world.To me, the hybrid...
Editor's note: Dario is a CDN Corporate Member. Charles was able to receive a free Dario device as a result of the relationship between Dario and CDN. To learn more about Corporate Membership click here.“What’s one of the most annoying things about Type One?”While that question has as many answers as there are people to ask it, my answer tends to be:the number of things that must be carried aroundhow old diabetes-related technology can feelEach morning after getting ready for the day, I shove my hands into the front pockets of my jeans to ensure I can fit all the necessary equipment inside, and each morning, I look at the pump on my hip and the test strip bottle jutting from my jeans pocket and I cringe a bit. When I first read about the Dario, this daily struggle came to mind. Then when CDN announced that they were sending out Dario meters and test strips to student members, I jumped at the chance to see if this device was the answer to these daily annoyances. Through CDN I was afforded the opportunity to try out the Dario, and after 30 full days of testing the device I am very impressed.First things first, the Dario...

Testing Opportunities

Editor's note: Roche is a CDN Corporate Member. CDN student members were able to participate in this tour as a result of the relationship between Roche and CDN. To learn more about Corporate Membership click here. Growing up with T1D, I didn’t know many other people with diabetes. Sure there were the few others in school, but we would often just exchange pleasantries in the nurse’s office before lunch. Coming into college, I feared it would be more of the same. But then I found The College Diabetes Network. I finally discovered the instantaneous friendship that can be built based the connection of diabetes.Joining the organization instantly brought new opportunities. When our Chapter president proposed a trip to Roche, a medical device company with a location on the north side of Indianapolis, I knew I wanted to go. When the day came, I was very excited for the experience.Upon arrival, the five Chapter members who were able to attend instantly received nothing but cheeriness and eagerness from the employees to have us in their facility. Various activities were planned, starting with a presentation on internships with Roche. The next part of our excursion took us on a tour of the manufacturing area on...
When I discovered that I was accepted into the 2016 Child Health Research Internship Program at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, I immediately began packing my bags to travel across the country and live in the Mile High City for nine weeks.As I soon learned, packing for a nine-week stay when you have type one diabetes can be pretty tricky. As I filled my carry-on bag with Omnipod and Dexcom supplies, extra syringes, all my prescriptions, and my emergency glucagon kit, I realized that I would have to be pretty crafty to fit the rest of my belongings in the rest of my suitcases!When I finally arrived in Colorado, however, the breathtaking view of the mountains was all I could think about. (And I mean literally breath-taking; the altitude difference from Florida to Colorado- about a mile- was enough to make me realize I had always taken breathing for granted!) When I situated myself in the heart of downtown Denver, I couldn’t wait to explore.Getting around the Denver and Aurora area proved to be an adventure in and of itself; my lack of car meant that I needed to rely on public transportation pretty heavily. Along with trains,...
College is something that causes anxiety and stress for everyone. As someone who has always been a homebody and very close with everyone in my family, the thought of leaving seemed like the end of the world. Throw type one diabetes into the mix and all that anxiety multiplies by 10!I was diagnosed with type one diabetes at the end of my sophomore year in high school. I was 15 years old, and my life came to a screeching halt. Diabetes is an overwhelming disease, and I was at the age where I was supposed to start gaining independence by driving, hanging out with friends and touring colleges. Not fair! Needless to say, I made my way through high school with lots of visits to the school nurse and a many trips into Boston for endo appointments. Finally graduation came and then it was onto college.After being accepted to Bryant University my junior year, I knew it was the perfect school for me. I loved the community feeling of the campus and it definitely didn’t hurt that it was only about 30 minutes away from home! My parents, my team of doctors and I met over the summer and decided...
(Written late last night while Christina Roth, CDN’S CEO and Founder was at the airport after the FDA Panel on updating the current Dexcom G5 Continuous Glucose Monitor System designation)I have never been so happy and content to be hanging out at the airport for the next few hours, waiting for a flight to get home just before midnight. Why you might ask?No, it is not because we just found out we received millions of dollars in funding to take care of all our programs forever, I wish….BUT it was still unbelievably exciting. I am hanging out at Reagan National Airport in D.C. after spending my day sitting in a very long FDA panel since 8 A.M this morning. Today, an FDA panel was convened to discuss the proposed update to the label of the Dexcom G5 Continuous Glucose Monitor System (CGM) to indicate that it replaces blood glucose monitoring (finger sticks), rather than simply supplementing it (which is what is currently approved).Most of us who use Dexcom just go ahead and dose off our readings unless we think they are off, so why do 10 people in Washington, D.C. need to give us the OK to do this? Well-...
I will be the first one to tell you that I do not like certain kinds of change, so I’m not completely sure what I was thinking when I told my mom I wanted something new. Fingers crossed, I started the process. Besides a few summer pump vacations, I have been on the same pump for over 13 years. I added POLI (pumper on long acting insulin) to my resume full time last spring. But besides that, little has changed.When I first started the new pump, the first words out of my mouth were “I have my life back,” while I flashed that 9-year-old-missing-her-front-teeth kind of smile. I was diagnosed at the beginning of the age of major changes in the diabetes world. Sweets were not frowned upon (moderation please), meaning my doctor quickly shot down the idea that I was to never have sweets again. To a 7 year old, those were the best words besides “presents”, “cartoons”, and “mac and cheese.” Unfortunately, this was also the time of NPH (the insulin- not the actor) and R. These were the days of having to wake up and eat 45 carbs of breakfast at...
Disclaimer: As a student member of the College Diabetes Network, I was selected to test the newly-approved Livongo In Touch Meter. All of the opinions in this post are my own. Feel free to contact me if you have questions.adifferentsurvivalguide.wordpress.com@briwolinCDN Staff Note: Interested in this and other exclusive opportunities? Sign up for student membership with CDN. (It's FREE.)As a college student in 2015, I am the epitome of the 21st century technology surge. I find my grade for the assignment I turned in a few days ago via the online platform I view on my Macbook. I check my email on my iPad Mini [which, by the way, I won by random drawing through the Informational Technology Services Department. I have a bit of a knack for winning things] so that my iPhone battery doesn’t die before my walk home after class. When the two clicks it takes me to register for classes next term at exactly 11:15 am returns a red X saying the class already filled in the two seconds it took for my browser to send information to the Wolverine Access system, I’m peeved. Being a student in 2015 is all about having the...
Living with diabetes often feels like a full time job. Without any pay. Or vacation time.Snacking requires concentration, exercising requires diligence, and going out with friends can be a downright nightmare. Add the novelty (and stress) of university into the mix and it doesn’t take long for management to drop down the priority list.I’ve been living with diabetes for 18 years, and I’m 21 now. When I first started university, I very quickly became busy meeting new friends (none of whom had diabetes), learning to live in a new city, and trying to keep up with my classes. I was playing intramurals at odd times of the night throughout the week, and using alcohol as a recovery drink most of the time. I didn’t tell anyone that I had diabetes, because it was a pain to explain, and I didn’t want anyone to think I was living within constraints, or living an unhealthy life.Diabetes management is a lot about pattern, and in university life is far from routine. In my second year my struggle with diabetes management started to show when I started having some really scary lows. I never went unconscious, or had to use glucagon, but I would...
We’re constantly told that a cure is “ten years down the road”, but our friends over at diaTribe have just published a book with the ADA to give us all a bit more insight into the actual timelines related to all of this awesome research: Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes: How Long Will We Have to Wait? To celebrate publishing Targeting a Cure, diaTribe is giving away 30 eBook copies! You can enter the giveaway here. Targeting a Cure covers the latest research directed toward curing type 1 diabetes, presenting both the challenges and the breakthroughs.Targeting a Cure is written from a patient perspective and is rich in detail on all the most recent developments in the field. With a foreword by Dr. Robert Ratner, Chief Scientific & Medical Officer at the ADA, an introduction by Dr. Aaron Kowalski, VP, Treatment Therapies at JDRF, and a conclusion by Kelly Close, Editor-in-Chief of diaTribe, Targeting a Cure is a thorough resource that reveals where we stand in the search for a cure for type 1 diabetes and where we are headed.diaTribe is a monthly newsletter about diabetes research and products – you can sign up for their monthly newsletter...

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