Technology

Three years ago I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) during my first semester of college. For the first two years I was completely unsure about switching from insulin pens to an insulin pump because I felt uncomfortable having a device attached to me 24/7. It wasn’t until I attended the CDN Annual Retreat last summer and saw the many different ways other students manage their diabetes that I decided to research different pumps and consider getting one. At the retreat I was able to hear from other college students about what their experiences with different pumps were like. After a lot of research and contemplation about becoming a pump user, I finally decided to contact Omnipod to begin the process of getting an insulin pump. I have now been wearing an Omnipod for one year and could not be happier with my decision to stop using pens. Below are a few things I like and dislike about using an Omnipod insulin pump.1.      Like: There are no tubes attached.One of my biggest worries about having a pump was the tubing that came along with it. When I learned of Insulet’s tubeless pod I quickly ruled out all other pumps. For me, having a...
Name: Jaime, RN on a telemetry unit at Backus Hospital in Norwich, ConnecticutGraduated from the University of Connecticut with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing in May 2017Hi all! My name is Jaime and I’m a new grad tackling Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) in the wild. I’ve been living with T1D for about 6 years and was diagnosed as a sophomore in high school. Finding out that I had a chronic condition at sixteen years old was very hard to deal with. The last thing I wanted to hear was that there was anything about me that might make me different from my peers during a period where I already felt vulnerable trying to fit in. Something unique about my diagnosis experience that made it a little bit easier is that my dad also lives with T1D. For as long as I can remember, our house has been stocked with Diet Coke and my mom was always checking that my dad had “his medicine” wherever we went. Up until my diagnosis, that was the extent of my knowledge of T1D. Having my dad by my side through this experience has helped make the transition a bit easier knowing that he...
As a college student with continuously changing insulin needs as a result of my busy schedule, a patient frustrated by the sluggish speed of the FDA to approve more closed-loop management systems (I am allergic to the Medtronic CGM) and a diabetes nerd, I had always thought of taking matters into my own hands and creating my own device. However, the complicated documentation and programming requirements that I read about online overwhelmed me.  After living with diabetes for 13 years and having recently faced a bout of endless high blood sugars as a result of a cracked insulin pump, I was a bit burned out and ready for a change. At a College Diabetes Network meeting, I met a professor who had set up an OpenAPS closed-loop Artificial Pancreas System. I was in awe! She explained how the system worked and allowed for corrections in her blood sugar without constant user input. I learned that the coding to set up the system was mostly copy and paste and that most of the parts could be purchased on Amazon. As a dedicated Amazon Prime member, I was sold! I realized that this was something that I could handle with a beginner...
Editor’s note: Dexcom is a CDN Corporate Member. To learn more about Dexcom click here, and to learn more about Corporate Membership click here. Freshman year of college is both super exciting and terrifying...and that’s without type 1 diabetes (T1D). Starting college presents a new opportunity to change everything about yourself. You are given the chance to be whoever you want to be. Chances are no one is going to know the old you anyway. Unfortunately, one of the changes that came with my college transition was a dramatic rise in my blood sugars. Luckily for me, I had started using the Dexcom two years before my first day of school. While working at a Diabetes camp, I noticed how much it helped when the campers had Dexcoms so I decided it would be good for me to try - And I haven’t stopped using it since. If you are new to college, let me caution you: there are more carbs in college food than regular food. I often joke that the dining staff sprinkle extra carbs in just to mess with the T1D’s, and even though my school has nutritional information online, it was quite the guessing game when it came...
Editors’ Note: AgaMatrix is a CDN Corporate Member and one of our CDN students recently shared her experience with the AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 meter with us. To learn more about this meter and Agamatrix, click here. If you've received a trial meter and would like information on how to receive an additional, but limited number, of test strips to continue testing the meter by completing a short survey, please click here. Imagine the joy of receiving a gift which you absolutely could not wait to open and play with. This is exactly how I felt after receiving the AgaMatrix Jazz Wireless 2 meter at the CDN Annual Retreat. However, I had to utilize some self-control since I wanted to finish off the test strips for the meter I was currently using before I started using the AgaMatrix meter.Two long weeks after receiving the Jazz Wireless 2 meter, I was finally able to start using it! First, I downloaded the AgaMatrix Diabetes Manager app onto my phone. As I was perusing through it, I discovered that it was really straightforward and easy to use. I could set my mealtimes for the meter to easily sync up with my schedule, set reminders for when I...
As a person with type one diabetes (T1D) who uses an insulin pump, I, like many of you, give new meaning to having something attached at the hip. For most people, the only thing they are attached at the hip to is a smart phone. Because type one’s are just like anyone else (but a lot cooler) we are no exception to this rule. Let’s be real, the amount of things we can do on our phone is pretty amazing. Most of us might mainly use it for harboring Instagram likes and sending emoji clad texts to the five group messages were all a part of - but did you know that you could be managing your blood sugars better with an app, too?I’m serious, for me, downloading a free app made a huge difference in my diabetes maintenance and helped me drop my hemoglobin A1C by 0.5 points. I would suggest trying a couple to see which ones work for you. The great thing about using apps for your diabetes is that they make diabetes care so quick and discreet. I’m never ashamed to test my blood sugar or use my pump in front of others, but it’s really...
 In life there are always firsts. Sometimes those firsts can be scary. Your first steps, your first day of school, and your first time driving come to mind. As a person with type 1 diabetes (T1D), my life is defined by a few other “firsts.” My first time giving myself a shot, my first sleepover after diagnosis, my first site change, and what this story is about, my first time travelling abroad with T1D. All my “firsts” had been scary, yet so rewarding, so I knew this experience wouldn’t be any different.I chose to walk 500 miles across Spain for six weeks with nothing but me and my hiking pack on a trail called the El Camino de Santiago. There would be daily 90 degree temperatures and hiking up and down mountains for over 10 miles each day, all while carrying 15 pounds on my back. This was definitely going to be a challenge.How was the time change going to affect my blood sugar? How was all this activity going to affect my blood sugar? How would I know how many carbs were in the Spanish meals? And most importantly how was I supposed to fit all of the insulin,...
Editors’ Note: Medtronic is a CDN Corporate Member and one of the participants in their MiniMed 670G clinical trial recently shared her experience with us. We recommend students participate in trials – it is a great way to learn more about what is happening in the diabetes sector! You can find trials near you here. My name is Ashlee and I’m a senior in a university nursing program in Denver, Colorado. I was diagnosed with type one diabetes (T1D) at the age of nine and have had a passion for diabetes treatment and research since a young age. I participated in the MiniMed 670G trial after being involved in other various Medtronic trials throughout the years. This trial would help Medtronic gain FDA approval on their hybrid closed loop system. (Yes, please!)I knew this would be a great opportunity but a big commitment. The study consisted of a one-week long overnight stay (with a steep learning curve), frequent downloads of my device data, and multiple check-ins throughout the process. After I completed the first part of the study, I was able to become part of a continuation phase which means I could wear it in the real world.To me, the hybrid...
Editor's note: Dario is a CDN Corporate Member. Charles was able to receive a free Dario device as a result of the relationship between Dario and CDN. To learn more about Corporate Membership click here.“What’s one of the most annoying things about Type One?”While that question has as many answers as there are people to ask it, my answer tends to be:the number of things that must be carried aroundhow old diabetes-related technology can feelEach morning after getting ready for the day, I shove my hands into the front pockets of my jeans to ensure I can fit all the necessary equipment inside, and each morning, I look at the pump on my hip and the test strip bottle jutting from my jeans pocket and I cringe a bit. When I first read about the Dario, this daily struggle came to mind. Then when CDN announced that they were sending out Dario meters and test strips to student members, I jumped at the chance to see if this device was the answer to these daily annoyances. Through CDN I was afforded the opportunity to try out the Dario, and after 30 full days of testing the device I am very impressed.First things first, the Dario...

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Editor's note: Roche is a CDN Corporate Member. CDN student members were able to participate in this tour as a result of the relationship between Roche and CDN. To learn more about Corporate Membership click here. Growing up with T1D, I didn’t know many other people with diabetes. Sure there were the few others in school, but we would often just exchange pleasantries in the nurse’s office before lunch. Coming into college, I feared it would be more of the same. But then I found The College Diabetes Network. I finally discovered the instantaneous friendship that can be built based the connection of diabetes.Joining the organization instantly brought new opportunities. When our Chapter president proposed a trip to Roche, a medical device company with a location on the north side of Indianapolis, I knew I wanted to go. When the day came, I was very excited for the experience.Upon arrival, the five Chapter members who were able to attend instantly received nothing but cheeriness and eagerness from the employees to have us in their facility. Various activities were planned, starting with a presentation on internships with Roche. The next part of our excursion took us on a tour of the manufacturing area on...

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