Exercise

Editor's note: this blog was originally posted on Jesse's blog, where he wrote about his experiences with Bike Beyond this summer. Check it out here. • • •This summer Team #BikeBeyond struck down the popular narrative that people with type 1 diabetes, or any "disabling" condition for that matter must hold you back from achieving your highest self. At some point nine years into my journey living with type 1 diabetes, I realized that having a support network was a crucial part of success in living with this disease. I wanted to help people living with type 1 realize that importance for themselves. But there's a challenge associated; you can't just tell someone to sign up for an event or online support group and expect that your words will inspire them to immediately do that. No, action is the key. That's why I went on this bike ride. I wanted to show people that you can do anything you want while living with type 1, but also, that none of us are doing this alone, nor could we have.Crying AND Laughing at the finish line !!! Love this family. Photo credit: Lindsey Freitas SUPPORT FOR PEOPLE WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES EXISTS IN MANY FORMS: Diabetes Online Community --> websites and apps like Beyond Type...
Editor's Note: This blog is for informational purposes only and to share a CDN Student's experience. It is not intended as medical advice or treatment. Consult with your healthcare provider (such as a primary care physician, endocrinologist, mental health provider, etc) for advice, possible diagnosis, treatment, information, etc. for any health related matter. If you think you are having a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Note from Meagan: Everyone experiences his or her diabetes differently. My experience with diabetes, how it has affected my own body image and mental health, and how my body image has affected my diabetes are completely unique to me, but the perspective I’m sharing is also one of many common challenges faced by persons living with type 1 diabetes. Please also be aware that I discuss eating disorders, so be careful if this may trigger a negative affect in your own mental health.In my life thus far with diabetes, the hardest part has been the feeling that it’s not a mountain - it’s Sisyphus, pushing a rock up a hill for all of eternity. When my blood sugar is high, I can bolus and bring it down. When it’s low, I can drink...

Kicking and T1D

Being a collegiate football kicker while having type 1 diabetes is not an easy task. Waking up at 5 am for workouts, then having class all day, and then going to a 2 and half hour long practice can really mess with your blood sugars, not to mention the adrenaline during an away game in front of 100,000 opposing fans. All of this means that I have to really pay attention to my body and what my blood sugars are doing constantly. In the 2 hours before a game when I start warming up, I will test my blood sugar at least 6 times. I have to pay really close attention to make sure that my blood sugar isn’t trending way up or down before the game.I can’t imagine having to go kick a game winning field goal in an important game and my blood sugar being low. I’m not even sure what I would do, there are no timeouts left and I would just have to go and hope I get lucky and make it. This puts a lot more stress on a kicker than someone without diabetes. Even in pregame when I’m testing the wind conditions and trying...
CDN and Team Type 1 are going to be featuring blogs about amazing students who are college athletes!Our first blogger is Hannah, who writes about her experience as a college swimmer, Team Type 1 Global Ambassador, and CDN Chapter Founder!-What sport do you play?Women's Swimming-Name of school, major and year in schoolCollege of William and MaryMajor: BiologyMinor: BiochemistryYear: Senior-How long have you been playing your sport?16 years (wow, that’s a long time…)-How did you tell your coach and teammates about your diabetes? What was their reaction like?I actually had a bad situation with a different college coach during my recruiting process. He never called me back after our first conversation and I could only assume that it was because I told him at the end of the conversation that I was diabetic--mind you, that is technically illegal, as college coaches cannot discriminated based on diseases. Regardless, I decided to keep my diagnosis in my back pocket and only tell future coaches about it when I was certain they knew I was a perfectly capable human being (as a student and as an athlete). So back to the question; I told my current coach about my diabetes when I walked onto...
Bio: Michelle was diagnosed with T1D in June of 1995. She is an Animal Science/ Pre-veterinary medicine major at Western Kentucky University. She plans on being a livestock veterinarian. My life with Type 1 Diabetes began 19 years ago. That’s a long time, right? I’m only 21 years old. It’s the only way of life I’ve ever known. That means that when I began college, I had to do it while managing diabetes.I gained about ten pounds the first semester I was in college. The only exercise I got was from walking to class. It didn’t help that my meal plan options were almost all fast food.When my second semester rolled around I wanted to be healthy. I met with a dietician and a personal trainer. So, the journey began. It was not easy. Dieting and beginning an exercise routine are never easy. The low blood sugars were almost enough to make me give up. I was having between 5 and 10 lows a day. One or two of those lows would wake me up at night. After a significant decrease in my basal rates over the course of a few months, my blood sugars began to even out. When...
HAPPY SUMMER!!! Er, well happy summer to all the college kids who are starting their breaks now…it’s not quite summer yet for high school kids still in school, or the working population, and the calendar doesn’t technically recognize summer for about another month yet (which explains some of the weather we’ve been having…), but as far as I’m concerned, summer started at 11 am on Monday, May 5 after my Organizational Behavior final. I have a lot of exciting things planned for this summer, like some trips to visit family and friends, and I’m eager to start my internship with CDN at the end of the month! I also intend to do some reading and writing—and I’m learning how to cook!—but one of my favorite parts of summer is the time I get to spend at the beach! I can hardly wait to grab a towel and some sunscreen and pass out on the sand for the day…but then I think about wearing a bathing suit, and I’m happy I have another month before it’s officially bikini weather.Like nearly every other girl around this time of year, I have vowed to eat healthier and hit the gym a little more...
During the study, I went to the gym twice! I only had to take about 15g of juice following my first workout and didn’t have to stop at any point. Yesterday, I started with a BG in the range that I usually like to start with (slightly above 180). I went on the spinning bike, and did intervals. Just as I suspected, I started slowly dropping about 8 minutes in (like clockwork), and started dropping pretty fast about 15 minutes in. Sure enough, my trusty pancreas gave me some glucagon so I could get through the workout without eating twice as many calories than I had burned. Over the course of my workout, I received three separate boluses of glucagon, which kept me in range while I was at the gym. Unfortunately, on my walk back (the device is still trying to figure out exercise), I ended up dropping too low and I had to treat BUT I was also given glucagon post-workout and the 15g of juice worked out. It was the kind of low where you’re tempted to eat the fridge… it took a lot of willpower to remind myself that I had a nurse by my side,...
Day 2 Bionic Pancreas Study: Reality check“Tropical Vacation”Ultimately, what being in this study represents is hope. Hope of less worry, less guilt, less work, and more “normalcy”. But what my second day in the study has reminded me is that although my bionic pancreas isn’t far from being widely available to everyone, this study is an integral part of getting the kinks out.So, while being in this study and having this bionic pancreas is like a tropical holiday (see the fancy drinks we got?), I have definitely had a few reality checks today to help remind me why we are doing this, and that this is a research study, and not a final product. I have been involved in research in some way for a few years now, but this study just helps to drive home the importance of getting involved in studies like this. Not only because it’s a wicked cool experience, but because it is truly a way to help change all of our lives (because I am definitely not the genius who is actually creating this algorithm…).So, today’s reality check (and my venting session…):1) IV’s are horrible. Period. During the day, we check our blood sugar every...

The Trouble With Travel

I’m currently sitting in the airport with my lacrosse team, waiting to board our flight to Florida for Spring Break (woohoo!).  We’ll be away for five full days: we’re opening our season with two big games, practicing, and getting some sun. We’ve been looking forward to this trip for weeks- when we got back to school after winter break in January, we entered pre-season, the most intense time of the year.  We’ve been practicing, lifting, conditioning, doing pool workouts, watching film, and even shoveling snow off of our turf field for two months straight…gotta love that New England weather…so as you can imagine, we’re itching to start playing some games and soak up some rays in Florida!I started packing two nights ago, and let me tell you, I had a hard time fitting all of my clothes, toiletries, swimsuits, and lax gear into one bag and a carry-on!  Plus, on top of my turfs, uniform, goggles, mouthguard, and the head of my disassembled stick, I had to fit my giant black bag of diabetes supplies into my backpack…I must’ve shifted things around about ten times in my carry-on until I got them all to fit.  Then, once I finally had...
Justin Morris lives in Sydney, Australia. He is a cyclist, a student at Marquarie University, a psychology/education major and does it all while living with Type 1 diabetes. Justin is currently a member of Team Type1, a global sports organization changing the lives of people with diabetes around the world through racing, groundbreaking research, international outreach, and philanthropic initiatives in developing countries. Justin was diagnosed 16 years ago at the age of 10 and describes the diagnosis as being both shocking and disappointing since he had dreams of one day becoming a jet fighter pilot. Since his diagnosis, he has changed his perspective from feeling held back to feeling challenged. He ascribes his wonderful, fulfilling life to managing his diabetes. We thought that CDN students would be interested in hearing about Justin’s experience with diabetes, college life, and being a member of Team Type1.How do you incorporate exercise into your diabetes routine in college?Every day I would ride my bike to university. This always started the day in a positive for me. Whilst at classes I would always make sure food was never too far away and I always carry snacks. Checking my blood sugar levels while at uni was...

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