Clinics and Providers

Allyson S. Hughes, M.A. is a doctoral candidate in the Psychology department at the University of Texas at El Paso.  She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1995 at the age of 7 years old..   .   .Switching health care providers (HCPs) can be challenging, especially when seeking a provider who is skilled in type 1 diabetes management for adults.  The to-do list is long and includes (but isn’t limited to) building rapport with a new provider, explaining medical history, and also discussing device data and/or medical needs.  It doesn’t have to be maddening though.  I’ve written some helpful tips to ease the burden of the process of finding a new provider.   To begin with, I believe that it best to approach this process in a positive light and view finding a new HCP as an information gathering mission. Gather Information on Potential HCPsThere are several steps to information gathering.  First, figure out what your insurance provides.  Often insurance plans change approved providers, so make sure that you have an updated provider list.  Second, know the difference between HMO and PPO plans—you have to get a referral for HMO plans but not for PPO plans. Knowing what you have...
Question:What kind of disabilities services should I ask for? I am a freshman in college and I'm not really sure what I might need from the Office for Disability Services (ODS) for T1D, and the ODS counselor isn't really sure what is appropriate to offer. Thanks.Answers:Maddy:You’ve already taken a smart step at the start of your college career by getting in touch with ODS! I went through my first two years of college not even knowing I could have registered with my university’s student disability services program having T1D. If you had a 504 plan (or other accommodations) during high school, you may want to bring that document with you to your next meeting with ODS. ODS can see how they can be formatted to fit your needs in a college setting.   Here are some accommodations that might be beneficial:  Permission to eat in class and leave to use the restroom. In my experience, very few professors have an issue if you eat in class or need to get up to use the restroom. However, just in case you come across one who does have a problem with this, you may want to have accommodations already in placeExtra time...
My name is Tyler Hill and I am a sophomore at the University of Delaware studying Computer Science. I have been active with our College Diabetes Network (CDN) Chapter on campus since the start of my freshmen year and a few months ago, I was elected president. My connection with (type 1 diabetes) T1D is something that only continues to grow. This disease has become such a huge part of my life, and I take any opportunity that I am given to speak out on it, educate the public, or spread awareness.When I was asked to speak at an annual Healthcare Symposium here at UD to share my T1D diagnosis story and the challenges I face as a college student with T1D, I simply couldn’t wait to get up on that stage. This allowed my leadership skills to truly shine.This year’s Healthcare Symposium topic was an “Update on Diabetes: Part II”. Allan Carlsen, a professor and the director of healthcare theatre here at Delaware, was in need of a guest speaker who could relate to diabetes. I was asked to make an appearance and I couldn’t be more thrilled I spoke on how I found out I had T1D, what...
One year ago, it was the week before finals in my sophomore year of college at UC San Diego, and I became ridiculously sick.  I didn’t have the energy to get out of bed and go to my classes, I slept all day, and found out that I had lost 20 pounds in a month without trying.  My roommates convinced me to go to Student Health Services, and the doctor there seemed very concerned about my health. He called an ambulance and I was taken to the Emergency Room at the UCSD hospital.  After hours of tests, and people shoving needles into my arms trying to find my veins to draw my blood, I was told that I had type 1 diabetes.  Four days later, with an ICU stay, a newly discovered chronic condition, and 1 session of diabetes education under my belt, I was released from the hospital and went back to take my finals.  After the whirlwind of leaving the hospital and taking finals was over, I was able to actually sit down and reflect on what happened in the past week and a half.  It felt like overnight, every thing about my life had changed.  I had...
The College Diabetes Network is thrilled to formally announce the launch of its Off to College Event Hosting Kits featuring the its newly published “Hosting an Off to College Event: A How-To Guide” for clinics/organizations and new series of Off-to-College Materials for students and families. This project was originally announced in June of 2014 when it received funding from the Lilly Grant Office. Since that time these materials have been created and published by CDN staff in collaboration with CDN’s Clinical Advisory Committee, and scientifically reviewed and approved by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). We consider it fitting to formally launch the program in conjunction with our presentation highlighting these materials at the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Annual Meeting in New Orleans this week, as so often these educators and their teams are the gatekeepers to tools and resources for families of children with diabetes. While the internet and social media are key tools used to access information, accessing trusted and quality information can be overwhelming and difficult. Diabetes providers still play an integral role in disseminating this information to patients and their families. CDN is both excited and humbled to be this trusted source of information to providers and...

AADE: Day 3

Today was another packed day of tabling, networking, and fun in the convention center! Danielle and I started our day off with a panel discussion titled: “DOC Rx: The Role of Social Media in Diabetes Care.” Going into the session, we had no idea what topics would actually be covered but nonetheless we went with open minds and our. As young 20-year-olds, we assumed that we likely already knew everything there is to know about social media and diabetes but wow… were we wrong! The panel discussion displayed an array of experience and knowledge in the “Diabetes Online Community,” including Jill Weissberg-Benchell, Jen Block, Kerri Spalding, Jeff Hitchcock, and Bennet Dunlap – all accomplished and respected individuals in the diabetes community. What started as a somewhat formally structured presentation turned into an emotional conversation about the importance of connecting with peers with diabetes – whether through in person contact or online communities. Much like Tina’s Day 2 presentation on young adults, I could write a whole blog post about the DOC Rx presentation – ironically since the topic of the discussion was online diabetes media – but I’ll save that for another day! In the end, the presentation made me...
I was diagnosed with type one diabetes a few days before my sixteenth birthday. Luckily, I have always known a couple of other individuals living with diabetes that I could call on for love, support, and guidance. There are always those moments, however, when you feel alone. When you feel like no one truly understands what it is like to live with this disease. When you feel like no one can see how hard you are working to just stay healthy and when you can never get a “diabetes break.” It is hard to explain the feeling you get when you meet another person that is also living with diabetes (whether that be Type 1 or Type 2). When I first met Tina, Amanda, and Jennie, I felt a certain connection and appreciation for who they are and what they deal with on a day-to-day basis. Although everyone manages their diabetes differently, I felt like I knew, to a certain extent, what they were going through. After arriving to our hotel in the early hours of the morning, I remember Amanda saying,  “I am putting my snacks here in case anyone goes low and needs them.” I could not take the...

AADE: Day 2

After a much-needed night of rest, we woke up Thursday morning ready for round 2 of tabling, exploring, and networking - all while avoiding the 90 degree, 80 percent humidity weather of Orlando! After grabbing a quick cup of coffee, we headed to the exhibit hall to our booth to settle in for another day of mingling with the conference attendees. Much to Danielle and I’s satisfaction, tabling today went even better than on Tuesday. We mingled and chatted with people who had never heard of CDN before and people who have been active in our organization since it’s very beginning, handing out brochures and swapping business cards like candy on Halloween! Explaining to clinicians about everything that the College Diabetes Network is working on and seeing their genuinely excited reactions is the most rewarding experience thus far in the conference! That and when a passerby says, “You all are doing wonderful things, I give your resources to all my young adult patients!” It reminds us that what we’re doing at CDN, and what I’ve been working on all summer in my Boston internship, is more than worthwhile – it’s changing the lives of young adults with diabetes like myself.Hesitant...

AADE: Day 1

Never in my life have so many diabetes experts surrounded me and never in my life have I realized how much I have yet to learn about diabetes! Sitting at our College Diabetes Network booth, wedged in between the amazing Diabetes Hands Foundation display and the amazingly delicious fiber supplement stand (who happen to constantly be making buttery movie theater popcorn), Amanda, Danielle, and I held down the CDN booth the whole first day. We answered questions about what we do at CDN and why we do it. To say the least, the conference is a sensory overload… in the best way possible!But let me rewind. We packed up and headed out of the CDN Boston office right around 5 o’clock Tuesday evening, following a productive day in our new office overlooking the Boston skyline. Unfortunately our flight to Orlando was delayed but that meant we were able to fit in a nice sit down dinner at a classic New England fish restaurant before the three-hour flight to Orlando! I can’t complain!Five hours later… we arrived in Florida! By the time we finally settled into our hotel room, the clock was approaching 2 am and we were all beyond exhausted. Nonetheless, by...
Day 1:I flew into San Francisco on a late Friday afternoon flight and arrived at the hotel around 10:30PM. I was exhausted, but I couldn’t wait to think about everything that the weekend would bring! We went to sleep early that night as the next morning was early and the rest of the weekend was packed!Day 2:My first full day started very early. Christina, Amanda, and I were out of the hotel, dressed in our CDN polos, vests, pins, and fleece jackets, and on our way to the exhibit center by 7AM. After going to registration, Amanda and I headed off to set up the CDN table. The exhibit hall was massive! There were huge signs from the ADA as we first walked in. In addition to the red hand and “STOP Diabetes” logo, there was a large banner that read, “The mission of the American Diabetes Association is to prevent and cure diabetes and improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.” I had this quote in my head throughout the entire weekend.As Amanda and I walked into the exhibit hall, I immediately felt astonished by the endless sea of flashing signs and tables full of diabetes products,...

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