Chapters

Recently, the CDN at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and I planned a fundraiser walk on our campus to raise money for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). Besides raising money for JDRF, we also wanted to raise awareness of diabetes on campus and to let students know about our student organization. As a newly founded student organization on campus, not a lot of students know about us. Students also don’t realize that diabetes is an illness that college students have at UNH. We wanted to implement an event that would put us on the student radar and to tell our fellow students that diabetes exists on campus!Planning the event was a daunting task at first.  It was hard to know where to start, but with the help of our members and Executive Board, we created multiple techniques to stay on track. We had less than six months to plan the event and we also had to work throughout the summer.  Between everyone working, traveling, and taking summer classes, it was difficult to plan an event over the summer. Our main form of communication was over text message and email. To overcome these challenges, we came up with the...
Question:Hi! My daughter is T1D sophomore I really think she could benefit from support & regular meetings with other T1D’s on campus. There is a CDN Chapter on her campus but she is not so outgoing & it’s a small group. How do I get someone to reach out to her? We all know the other girls are struggling too-- this illness is a beast at best. Thank you!Answers:Abbey:First off, I am happy to hear that there is a CDN Chapter on your daughter’s campus, and even more excited you want her to get involved. I go to Rowan University in New Jersey. Coming in as a freshman, I knew I wanted to get involved, but I just didn’t know how! It just so happened that there was not a CDN chapter on Rowan’s campus, so I started one. It has been one of the best things that has happened in my college career. I know as a Chapter leader that it is difficult to find every diabetic and reach out to them. I would if I could, but there are rules at my campus that stop me from getting names of students with type one. Your daughter’s school may...

Greek Life & T1D

 The transition from high school to college as someone with  type one diabetes (T1D) is stressful enough as it is, so when I signed up to go through formal recruitment, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I knew from early on that I wanted a solid, empowering and supportive network of women to associate myself with, and had grown up with an older brother and decided it was time to have some sisters. Going through recruitment was an amazing process, each sorority was so welcoming, intrigued and focused on our conversations which was really special. They all had such strong ties to different philanthropies, and an obvious love for their other sisters. One sorority in particular stood out to me and I felt a strong connection with them. Fast forward to the end of the weekend, and my new home became Alpha Omicron Pi.The rest of spring semester seemed to fly by and freshman year was nearly at an end. College became an entirely new experience with girls asking about my insulin pump, checking to see if I was okay, and sending me texts every once in a while to let me know they were thinking...
Editor's note: this blog was originally written by Hannah and posted on the Miami University CDN Chapter blog. Check it out here. • • •Let me start this post off with a short story.  On my second day after moving out for college, I was at a talk about leadership.  I was, begrudgingly, taking out my meter to test my blood sugar before (okay, you caught me, 3/4 of the way through) my meal when another student in the room said, “Hey!  Is that a meter?”  When I responded that I did indeed have type one diabetes, he happily pulled out his cgm and rolled up his sleeve to show me his omnipod and stated, “I’m John”.I do not think I thought much of this interaction in the moment, but now, with a year of hindsight, I realize that this interaction was the start to a brand new chapter in my type one diabetes journey.   I was diagnosed with type one diabetes at the age of 1 and I grew up like any other normal, happy child.  There were not a lot of other people with type one in my school but each year of elementary school I would read my class...
Because of the T1D communityI’ve been living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) for close to nine years of my life, and I have learned so many things about the disease and about myself in the midst of it all. Believe it or not, I am still learning every day. In the early honeymoon years of my T1D journey, the term “chronic illness” sounded like a scary medical label that made me a fragile alien on this planet where the majority of the inhabitants have functioning pancreases. As a young adult, I now know that defined in the Merriam-Webster dictionary, the word chronic means “continuing or occurring again and again for a long time.” Boy, isn’t that the truth? Diabetes is  the one thing that remains constant in my ever-changing life. As my life changes, so has my attitude towards and knowledge of diabetes.So I’m writing this to let you in on one of the most important un-written rules of diabetes care that I have come to learn throughout my years, experiences, and adventures with diabetes.T1D community is so incredibly important.I remember the first time my doctor recommended I go to diabetes camp when I was twelve years old. My initial...
I was beyond thrilled when I was accepted to attend the College Diabetes Network (CDN) Annual Retreat in Maine this year. The purpose of the retreat is to further develop leadership skills, provide networking opportunities, and allow for students to share experiences. Knowing I would be among so many leaders, advocates, and inspiring individuals who cared so much about the type one diabetes (T1D) community was so exciting. From past leadership conferences and trainings I’ve attended, my expectations were to attend sessions and write notes or simply retain the information that would be thrown at us. CDN went above and beyond with their retreat, and it’s an experience that has inspired me to get more involved, better myself as a leader, and advocate for diabetes awareness.The structure of the retreat has been similar to my expectations in that there are breakout sessions, but the way the sessions are structured is truly innovative. CDN is not only providing us with leadership opportunities, but they are utilizing the students as evaluators, innovators, and future leaders for advocating for T1D. Each session began with a topic or concept presented to us, then whoever was running the session allowed the students to brainstorm ideas...
Almost three weeks before I was supposed to move to Boston for my first-year of school at Simmons College, my entire life was flipped in a completely unexpected direction. At 18 years-old, on August 6th, 2015 I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) during a routine check-up at my pediatrician’s office. My doctor discovered that I had lost 10 pounds since the year before, even though I was not trying to lose weight. She immediately began to investigate, and when they took my blood sugar, it was over 600. At the time, I did not realize I was showing some of the classic symptoms of T1D – I was painfully thirsty, but I blamed it on the hot weather. I was always tired, but I blamed it on my long work hours and having to get up early. I was always hungry and ate snacks and meals all-day, but I always have had a big appetite. I never suspected anything was wrong because I was absolutely unaware and ignorant of what T1D even was.Both my parents and I (mostly them) were already on edge and worried about my transition to Boston, but diabetes made the transition even more difficult....
When I decided to go to college three hours away from home, I knew there were certain aspects of my life I would be giving up. One in particular that had the biggest impact on me was giving up my close knit group of other people with type one diabetes (T1D) that had become my family since I was diagnosed in December 2008. I didn't expect to miss having that connection at Mississippi State University (MSU). I had an incredible support system of T1D’s and their families that lived close by. Yes, I could always call them if needed, but it wasn’t the same as being able to meet up with them when I was struggling or needed supplies.My second semester I began searching for a group of people my age with T1D somewhere near my college. There was absolutely nothing. Like any good college student, I turned to google. I joined a couple of online groups, but it still wasn't the same as in person connections. Then during my searches, I found the College Diabetes Network (CDN). I immediately requested more information because there was not a single CDN Chapter in the state of Mississippi. It didn't take long...

CDN Grants- Awareness

Editor’s Note: CDN was able to provide $5,000 in grants to 16 CDN Chapters for the 2016-2017 school year. The funding for these grants was provided by Lilly Diabetes. You’ll be hearing about their events in our blog over the next few months! University of California-Davis- EmmetAs a type 1 diabetes (T1D) group at the University of California- Davis (UC- Davis), we knew we wanted to do something special for College Diabetes Week 2016. After talking about how many of our friends have misconceptions about what it means to have T1D, we decided it would be worthwhile to inform our fellow students what life with diabetes means. With that goal in mind, and the help of the funding from the College Diabetes Network (CDN) grant, we began to make outreach plans for College Diabetes Week.At the start of the week, we printed out flyers to promote an informational night and bought supplies to make a poster for outreach. Our poster explained what T1D is, how it is treated, and the truths behind some misconceptions about it. Having reserved a table outside the coffee house on campus, we set up our poster throughout the week, handed out flyers promoting our event, and had...
Coming to college, I was sure that I would be able to handle my diabetes all on my own. It had been 12 years, I had been to sleep away camp, traveled to Europe, and grown up with this. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) had never been a huge burden in my life and I did not expect much to change when I moved out. However, after just one week, I humbled up. I could tell right away that this was a new life. My numbers were fluctuating from 400 to 50 within hours, I was lethargic, drinking juice constantly, and changing my pump site almost every day. The worst part was that no matter how hard I tried, I could not crack the code. I was testing my blood sugar more than ever, counting my carbs as best as I could with the new mysterious dining hall food, exercising… you name it. There seemed to be nothing that I could do.When I moved in, I jammed four months of every diabetes supply possible in tall plastic drawers that I hid in the back of my closet. I knew that I had to tell my new friends about diabetes, but I...

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