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I was barely awake, but enough to reach over and grab my phone from my nightstand. “I just spent like 30 minutes panicking and setting up international calling on this phone to get ahold of you—you’re below 40.”My spouse follows my data via Dexcom Share, and I was less than 10 days into my summer abroad in Moscow, Russia via American Councils. For me it was around2-3am. I woke up just a bit more and checked-in with my body. I definitely wasn’t that low, but I was low. I took some sugar tabs, reassured my spouse that I was fine, and went back to bed.Glucose tabs in RussiaTo be fair, their concern was perfectly understandable. I was still less than one year into my diagnosis at that time, in a country I had never been to, and living with people I had just met a week prior. Still, it turns out that the low reading was a false alarm—I had been sleeping on my Dexcom sensor, which can cause “compression lows” – false low readings from pressing on the site too hard. Perhaps it’s better to experiment with new sites for your devices before leaving the country.There are a few...
I have been a Type 1 Diabetic (T1D) for just over half my life, and it is pretty interesting for me to think about how my perception of my condition has changed over the years. For example: when I was diagnosed at nine-and-a-half years old, I asked the doctor when I would start foaming at the mouth (and was promptly told diabetes is NOT rabies), I hated needles, and I wanted to drink regular soda without needing to eat something that might slow down its digestion. I didn’t want anyone to know I had the thing, not even extended family. Fast forward to college where my biggest concerns with T1D were extreme blood sugars during exams worth their weight in gold to my GPA (which happened far more frequently than I would’ve liked), needing to change my pump site after a long, busy day, and needing to find the time in my schedule to commute an hour by public transit to the Joslin Diabetes Center for my endo appointments.Now that I’m four months out of college, it’s funny to look back at class, interspersed with a fraternity event here, a hunger project trip there, and a CDN meeting in between...
CDN’s Virtual Intern, Rebecca, recently interviewed Jessica Lynn, a Nurse Midwife who specializes in T1D. 1) What contraception methods would you recommend for college age women with type 1 diabetes? Contraception is very personal. There’s no one size fits all approach, including for women and girls with type 1. First, I would suggest asking yourself some questions to help guide you to a method you’ll be happy with (it’s ok if some of the answers are unclear):Do you want to be pregnant in the next few years? How do you feel about trying something with hormones? Are you ok using something that goes into your body? How important is keeping your method to yourself?Do you want something that will make your periods lighter? Would you be bothered by spotting or no periods at all?Are you likely to forget to take a pill at the same time daily?These days we have lots of contraceptive options. If you’re young with type 1, have normal blood pressure and lipids and don’t have vascular complications, you really have your choice of methods. Even if you do have an additional risk factor above, you still have many options. One of the most important considerations is effectiveness, as having an unplanned pregnancy with...
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEMannKind Corporation Joins the College Diabetes Network (CDN) as a Corporate MemberBoston, MA – Dec. 4, 2017 – The College Diabetes Network (CDN), a 501c3 non-profit organization whose mission is to provide innovative peer based programs which connect and empower students and young professionals to thrive with diabetes, recently added MannKind Corporation to its suite of corporate members.MannKind Corporation, the makers of Afrezza® (insulin human) inhalation powder, will be one of a dozen corporate partners in the diabetes industry to join CDN’s Corporate Membership Program. The only inhaled rapid-acting mealtime insulin in the United States, Afrezza is used to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes. For more information, including important safety information, on Afrezza, visit www.afrezza.com.“The life of a college student is fast-paced, active and often stressful; and diabetes need not slow anyone down,” said Michael Castagna, Chief Executive Officer of MannKind Corporation. “Afrezza’s rapid-acting mealtime insulin can be a great option for young adults with diabetes looking for an inhalable insulin to help maintain their A1C goal. We are excited to be part of this network and connect with college students affected by diabetes, and to raise awareness while supporting other industry partners.”The College Diabetes Network...
Three years ago I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) during my first semester of college. For the first two years I was completely unsure about switching from insulin pens to an insulin pump because I felt uncomfortable having a device attached to me 24/7. It wasn’t until I attended the CDN Annual Retreat last summer and saw the many different ways other students manage their diabetes that I decided to research different pumps and consider getting one. At the retreat I was able to hear from other college students about what their experiences with different pumps were like. After a lot of research and contemplation about becoming a pump user, I finally decided to contact Omnipod to begin the process of getting an insulin pump. I have now been wearing an Omnipod for one year and could not be happier with my decision to stop using pens. Below are a few things I like and dislike about using an Omnipod insulin pump.1.      Like: There are no tubes attached.One of my biggest worries about having a pump was the tubing that came along with it. When I learned of Insulet’s tubeless pod I quickly ruled out all other pumps. For me, having a...
 To begin, I want to get a point or two across. First, individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) manage their chronic illness and may struggle with it in their own unique way. However, there can definitely be similarities between individuals and their management/struggles, which brings me to my next point: there are many individuals living with T1D who I have met or know of that have struggled with anxiety and depression due to life struggles, but also managing their T1D . To me, this situation seems like a common occurrence among the young adult T1D community and I myself have experience with this situation.During my senior year of high school, I felt as though I was at an all-time low. I was juggling a heavy workload at school, a part-time job, getting ready for college, and managing fluctuating blood sugars from the stress I was under. My A1C ended up rising a little, which really disappointed me. The stress and anxiety became overwhelming to the point where I just felt numb. At this point, I began doing what would make me feel better in the moment. My tactics included blowing off homework in order to get more sleep, putting off...
Recently, the CDN at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and I planned a fundraiser walk on our campus to raise money for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). Besides raising money for JDRF, we also wanted to raise awareness of diabetes on campus and to let students know about our student organization. As a newly founded student organization on campus, not a lot of students know about us. Students also don’t realize that diabetes is an illness that college students have at UNH. We wanted to implement an event that would put us on the student radar and to tell our fellow students that diabetes exists on campus!Planning the event was a daunting task at first.  It was hard to know where to start, but with the help of our members and Executive Board, we created multiple techniques to stay on track. We had less than six months to plan the event and we also had to work throughout the summer.  Between everyone working, traveling, and taking summer classes, it was difficult to plan an event over the summer. Our main form of communication was over text message and email. To overcome these challenges, we came up with the...
Starting college reminded me of how I felt when I was first diagnosed with type one diabetes (T1D). Being thrust into a new beginning is terrifying, but while discovering how to fit into a new world, it is vital to realize how diabetes fits in as well. I was diagnosed with T1D two weeks before starting high school. I had only known life with T1D in the context of school, sports, and home in a small town. Diabetes was my own cross to bear but I had support and help everywhere I looked, from parents, to friends, to coaches. Then came the independence and flexibility of college: I was unprepared for how isolated and naïve I would feel being completely on my own. I experienced burnout and denial and because of this, not only did my health take a hit, but my self-confidence did as well. As a sophomore, I now have a year of college under my belt.  The past year has given me a wealth of life experiences I wish I had last year - as well as an overwhelming sense that I still have no idea what I’m doing, which somehow feels just about right for a sophomore...
Hello, College Diabetes Network!My name is Emma Melton and I’m ecstatic to be the newest member of the CDN Board. I’m particularly excited to join this organization to support college students and recent graduates because of my own experience having T1D.I was fourteen when I was diagnosed with T1D, but was familiar with the disease because my younger brother Sam was diagnosed ten years prior. I didn’t realize how much harder T1D would become in college when I moved out of my supportive parents’ house. I struggled to manage my diabetes during all four years as an undergraduate at Harvard. I wish that I had access to a community of other T1Ds going through the same difficult transition.After college, I spent two years as an AmeriCorps teacher before attending law school. As a young adult, I became better at dealing with T1D in stressful environments (like taking the bar exam), while exercising (running half marathons takes careful planning), in the workplace (I always have a stash of juice boxes in my desk drawer!) and in unexpected scenarios (like losing a suitcase when traveling internationally). A key factor in the improvement of my T1D management was sharing my difficulties with friends...
Between finishing assignments, studying for exams, writing reports, staying involved in extracurricular activities, staying in shape, having a social life AND managing diabetes,maintaining a healthy eating regiment is often something that can be pushed to the wayside during college. So, how do you balance your diet while balancing everything else in your life? Here are a few tips that could help keep your eating habits in check:1.      Plan, Plan, and Plan a Little More!With the busy, fluctuating schedules of college students, fitting in time for meals can be hard. This is why planning when you will be eating is SO important for your health! A consistent eating pattern can increase your focus and give your brain the energy that it needs in order to accomplish your tasks at hand. If you know that you will be away from your dorm or apartment, be sure to pack food or bring money so that you will be able to nourish yourself while meeting those deadlines! Planning can be things like meal prep as well. If you know that you will have a busy week, but want to stay healthy in your habits, then you can prepare some food ahead of time....

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From The Blog

Danielle gives us tips for studying abroad based on her experiences in Russia
Alumni spotlight of Nathan Finberg
CDN’s Virtual Intern, Rebecca, recently interviewed Jessica Lynn, a Nurse Midwife who specializes in T1D.

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The College Diabetes Network (CDN) is a 501c3 non-profit organization whose mission is to provide innovative peer based programs which connect and empower students and young professionals to thrive with diabetes.

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